Travel stories of a saree enthusiast

I don’t think travelling in sarees is a big deal at all, I have photos of my Mother and GrandMother both globetrotting in their stunning six yard beauties forming my earliest fashion inspirations and now I am just continuing the tradition.

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Photos: Vincent Boyer (Say hi on instagram @vincetravelbook)

The memories I have of travelling on my own, initially to university, then moving cities for work before eventually moving to a different continent, to now traipsing all over the world, all have sarees attached to them.

I remember carrying three sarees when I had to pack up my life and condense it to 40 kgs for my move to Australia. I don’t think travelling in sarees is a big deal at all, I have photos of my Mother and GrandMother both globetrotting in their stunning six yard beauties forming my earliest fashion inspirations and now I am just continuing the tradition.

When we travelled to Europe this summer, road tripping across the spectacular South of France, bumming around in Amsterdam before coming home to the countryside around Paris, I carried six sarees and was given one while I was there. If you have been following @dtanaya or @pleatsnpallu on instagram you have seen photos in realtime of my travel adventures in these sarees.

Although I carried half a dozen six yard beauties, I carried no underskirt or saree blouse as I absolutely don’t believe that they are needed especially when living out of a suitcase for weeks, flying budget airlines and dealing with the Paris metro. Every piece of clothing I carried could be worn with each other and I really don’t like matching separates.

In these photos I am wearing a chiffon leheriya saree from Jamnagar with a dabu print top and leather shorts at the lovely Château de Pierrefonds. It is a medieval castle at the edge of the Forest of Compiègne, northeast of Paris and the picturesque village with a lake in the centre is also very pleasant to explore.

Leheriya gets its name from the Hindi word for wave, ‘leher’ and is a tie & dye technique that produces ripple-like patterns. I have many many sarees in Bandhani as well as Leheriya and cannot get enough of them, this saree barely weighs anything and looks pretty even when its crushed (at least to me, I hate ironing clothes).

Sarees and travel both play an integral part in my stories so here’s to travelling the world one handcrafted saree at a time!

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Author: Tanaya Das

PleatsnPallu is a unique project started in Sydney, Australia by Tanaya Das to celebrate the identity of South Asian women every where. This is a quest to find what the six/ nine yards of fabric means to us and celebrating who we are in a saree. The narrative is focussed on celebrating all kinds of bodies with extra attention on those that are less celebrating in the mainstream.

2 thoughts on “Travel stories of a saree enthusiast”

  1. Breathtaking! Also YES to wearing them however you want, as you are moved to. I have been out for a burger, to the grocery store, and hanging around the house in mine. I do keep adding to my collection because my Dadi’s vintage pieces feel a little too special to just take anywhere anytime, and most of them are silk. Do you have any tricks for caring for silk while you tromp all over the place in it? PS: I love the leather and silk combination.

  2. That backdrop and the colour of the saree..really beautiful..there is something about the saree moving with the breeze.Vince ..thumbs up!!Will meet you someday and tell you how awesome your work is:):):)

    As an Indian woman brought up with women in the family talking about sarees, I still feel that there is so much. to learn and love about sarees.

    A Saree is like a family recipe ,every house has its own .So every family has its own family saree story.Thats what makes it even more unique.

    Similarly I feel if you love something you don’t necessarily need to know everything about it..there are some things you love because you love it..period.

    I love the saree:)

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