Gamcha saree and Sydney autumn

Every piece in this outfit has tells a story, of the people who make it and the indigenous cultures that benefit from consumers ethically purchasing original pieces of hand-made clothing.

 

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Photos: Vincent Boyer (Say hi on instagram @vincetravelbook)

The saree I am wearing here is a coarse, stiff, handloom-ed cotton gamcha worn with a kediyu that young Bharvad girls wear paired with a Wayuu Mochila bag.

The gamcha is a thin, coarse, traditional cotton towel from the Indian subcontinent that comes in different sizes, colour schemes and complexity of pattern based on the width of the loom. They are a staple in homes where I come from in East India, are woven locally and I find the chequered pattern endlessly fascinating.

The Bharvad are a group of people who used to lead nomadic lives herding cattle, goats and sheep in Gujarat, western India. They wear the most amazing clothes as well as jewellery, all of which is hand-crafted in designs and patterns specific to the tribe.

I don’t believe in having matching blouses and petticoats for every saree, I like to make my separates work with multiple items. For example: This kediyu is worn here as a saree blouse, is also used as a jacket as well as a top with jeans and I am actually wearing a denim skirt under the saree.

The bag in the photos is a Wayuu Mochila piece made by the indigenous women of the Wayuu Tribe from La Guajira, Colombia. Each Mochila Bag is a unique piece of art on its own and takes about a month to be hand-knitted.

Every piece in this outfit has tells a story, of the people who make it and the indigenous cultures that benefit from consumers ethically purchasing original pieces of hand-made clothing. I am looking to build a more meaningful wardrobe comprising of pieces representing a deeper connection to the earth through natural fabrics and to cultures who make their clothes through artisanal crafting and design.

 

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Author: Tanaya Das

PleatsnPallu is a unique project started in Sydney, Australia by Tanaya Das to celebrate the identity of South Asian women every where. This is a quest to find what the six/ nine yards of fabric means to us and celebrating who we are in a saree. The narrative is focussed on celebrating all kinds of bodies with extra attention on those that are less celebrating in the mainstream.

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